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Thread: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

  1. #1
    Steve Degon's Avatar
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    Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Private Investigator’s in Fugitive Recovery


    By Steven De Gon, LPI/CFRA



    I feel that this will be a meaningful outline why Private Investigator are better at Fugitive Recovery than the so called “Bounty Hunter”. Foremost private investigators have very good resources as well as the natural instinct in locating individuals. The so called bounty hunter doesn’t have the resources such as IRB, Merlin, LocatePlus, to name a few. We also do further investigations as far as side tracking the individual. When doing fugitive recovery side tracking is important, for the individual that we are hunting always go home to mommy, daddy, husband, wife , son, daughter. They have to have some source of contact with them.
    We also go as far , if need be search court records, assets, motor vehicles, and so on. The typical bounty hunter, not saying all, just don’t think outside the box. Bounty hunters don’t require licensing in many states which has the tendency to create “wanna be’s”, or what I would like to call “Cowboys”.
    Another thing I find is a problem with the average bounty hunter is they have very poor surveillance skills and patience. It’s kick in the door, and that can create problems for both them and the individual or the party that has nothing to do with the suspect at all and this can be very dangerous for everyone and cause future problems for the industry. This is a business that could create great things for private investigators in the future. Some states have even passed or considering passing laws that only investigators can do fugitive recovery.
    Hunting Fugitives is like looking for a needle in a hay stack at times. Some of them are career criminals and they have been running from the law all there lives and they now how to stay hidden. That is where the skills of a Private Investigator comes into play. For, example tracking down the homeless, no address, no car, no family or no family locally, nothing. Where do you start looking. Well a good investigator now’s where to look. There is a old saying , that investigators learn first and foremost you have to “think outside the box”. The application that is filled out when someone is bonded doesn’t always tell the truth. So; the process of elimination starts. So are all the numbers good, are the address right, do they really own that vehicle. This is where IRB comes into play or go to the county building and running records or even possibly go to the County jail and ask them for the arrest records.
    These are just a few steps to start with.
    Investigating isn’t just in the office you have to go out and do surveillance and ask questions. Sometime talking to people face to face can tell you if they are lying or telling the truth. Or; locating that mother-in-law or father-in-law or ex-wife or husband is a very good start. Remember in our business there is no such thing as a coincidence. Some how one thing leads to another.



    Visit my forum site for more, information;

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    Hey Steve,
    I am in South Carolina and ready to do more with the bail enforcement end of the business. I am learning and willing to put forth an effort in any way needed, how should I go about getting into this line of work as well as other P.I assignments? S.C has laws against freelance bounty hunters but how can I do this legally?

    Thanks for your time,
    Todd Hunter

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    Todd,that sounds like that could be interesting.I am going to check about that in my state of Alabama.GOOD LUCK !!!!!!

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    Very nice article. I am a licensed bail bondsman "bounty hunter" in ohio and you are very right about the "kick in the door" that alot of bounter hunters have, at least around here. Since I have chosen this career it has given me alot more options on fugitive recovery, alot more places to look, as well as more knowledge on finding people. In order to become a successful bounty hunter, you have to be good at tracking people, there is no "if ands or buts" about it. P.I. work will give you more of that "aggressive" search option, as you have already mentioned, car records, etc... Most think bounty hunting is just "going to kick the door down" or "putting cuffs on someone" it is much more than that and it's not even close to a 9-5 job, you have to move when they move. Which alot of times makes it stressful on family and friends. Good luck to anyone wanting to get into this career, check your state laws, that is the best place to start.

    Scott

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    Hello, Steve i'm a licensed Bail Enforcement Agent in Colorado and have been for several years, up until a few years ago anyone could arrest anybody for the bondsman with thier permission in Colorado and since they passed the restrictions for a license it has cleaned up the bus. and weeded out most of the so-called wanna-be's but, the reform has been hard on those of us who have ethics and understand nobody's perfect and everybody makes mistakes some are just more extreme than others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Shiverdecker
    Hello, Steve i'm a licensed Bail Enforcement Agent in Colorado and have been for several years, up until a few years ago anyone could arrest anybody for the bondsman with thier permission in Colorado and since they passed the restrictions for a license it has cleaned up the bus. and weeded out most of the so-called wanna-be's but, the reform has been hard on those of us who have ethics and understand nobody's perfect and everybody makes mistakes some are just more extreme than others.
    The State just made the laws here restricting bail bondsman in Ohio not to long ago as well.. but there are still a few that have the old attitude.. I think as time passes it will pass, at least I hope so.

    Scott

  7. #7
    There are bad apples in every field, just be careful and know what you are doing.
    If you "kick in the wrong door" and "shoot someone" your whole life could change in that brief instant, remember "knowledge is power"
    Good Luck to all of you.

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    Bounty Hunting in Wisconsin

    I know that Bounty Hunting in Wisconsin can land your butt in jail if you just kick in doors and hope that you don't shoot the wrong person. Here we have to locate the fugitive and call the local law enforcment to pick up the person. I think that in most cases, here anyway, the "DOG" impression is limited and that is a great thing because as far as I am concered and was tought safty is first,yours as well as others and treating fugitives as clients of your clients is a good idea.

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    South Carolina Bail Enforcement

    I have recently spoke with a former law enforcement officer and local Bail bondsman about this career. He gave me alot of great information and a better understanding of the laws of my state. Some probably will not take the time to speak with you but it's a good source for info. Here you have to take a 20 hour training class and then a test for your license, you also have to have someone willing to take you and give you training in the field. All of this is through the Department of insurance here in S.C. Hope this helps someone here or gives someone a possible lead! Good Luck to you all!!

    Todd Hunter

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    I have just completed my required training to become a "Fugitive Recovery Person" here in California. I think that for the most part California has a good system. If anyone is interested in becoming a bounty hunter here they should take a look at the requirements at: http://www.researchandinformation.com/PC1299.pdf

    I have several contacts and can,t wait to get started.

    Good luck to us all.

    Mark

  11. #11
    All the comments I've read from the IPIU members regarding Fugitive Recovery are good. However, there has been one extremely vital piece of advice that has been left out, or brushed over. That vital piece of advice that should "always" be followed, regardless of the bail jumper's history, is never, ever pursue a fugitive alone. At the very least, always...always "partner up", because you never know what might be waiting for you on the other side of the door.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Walters
    All the comments I've read from the IPIU members regarding Fugitive Recovery are good. However, there has been one extremely vital piece of advice that has been left out, or brushed over. That vital piece of advice that should "always" be followed, regardless of the bail jumper's history, is never, ever pursue a fugitive alone. At the very least, always...always "partner up", because you never know what might be waiting for you on the other side of the door.
    Allen you are so right. Partner!

  13. #13

    Question No licensing in CO

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Shiverdecker
    Hello, Steve i'm a licensed Bail Enforcement Agent in Colorado and have been for several years, up until a few years ago anyone could arrest anybody for the bondsman with thier permission in Colorado and since they passed the restrictions for a license it has cleaned up the bus. and weeded out most of the so-called wanna-be's but, the reform has been hard on those of us who have ethics and understand nobody's perfect and everybody makes mistakes some are just more extreme than others.
    UMMMM Andrew

    I am a licensed bail bonding agent in Colorado. I am certified to do bail enforcement. There is a BIG difference. Colorado does not required it's BEAs to be licensed and there is NO licensing available for BEAs.

    I agree that bail enforcement is now regulated by requiring that agents complete a POST certified course and be cleared through CBI and FBI to be felony free for the prior 15 years.

    Personally I wish there was a licensing and internship procedure as there is in some other states. Even with our new regulations there are too many wanna-bes that are a danger to the professionals. They pass the course and the background check, buy a gun (sometimes they even know how to use it), and start busting doors. They haven't a clue as to the dangers of what the FTA might do to them. They also have no clue how to track and "talk in" a perp. That takes a lot of training and investigative experience and I would welcome the requirements for this training for all of our safety.

    I love my work.

    Kathy

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    Thumbs up Thanks!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy Blackshear
    UMMMM Andrew

    I am a licensed bail bonding agent in Colorado. I am certified to do bail enforcement. There is a BIG difference. Colorado does not required it's BEAs to be licensed and there is NO licensing available for BEAs.

    I agree that bail enforcement is now regulated by requiring that agents complete a POST certified course and be cleared through CBI and FBI to be felony free for the prior 15 years.

    Personally I wish there was a licensing and internship procedure as there is in some other states. Even with our new regulations there are too many wanna-bes that are a danger to the professionals. They pass the course and the background check, buy a gun (sometimes they even know how to use it), and start busting doors. They haven't a clue as to the dangers of what the FTA might do to them. They also have no clue how to track and "talk in" a perp. That takes a lot of training and investigative experience and I would welcome the requirements for this training for all of our safety.

    I love my work.

    Kathy

    In Re:
    Kathy, i want to compliment you on this entry, although i am a newbie to this forum, i am quite sure it is best to try to talk in perps when possible. I believe looking into their case history can help assess whether this has to be a take-down or peaceful surrender for the perp.

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    Hi Kathy, I've been of-line for a while with computer issues and I just got it back from the shop seems to be ok so far so i'm keeping my fingers crossed,anyway as far as colorado goes for bail enforcement if you didn't write the bond you are required to get cert. though a 16 credit hour course that pertains only to the rules and regulations of making an arrest as a Hunter for a bondsperson please correct me if I'm wrong but, I also know that most bondspersons in Colorado won't even talk to you unless you have a copy of your completion cert. and a copy of your background check.Hey give me a shout when you get time knowledge is power, right

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Kathy Blackshear is one of the most respected Bail Enforcement Agents in the country, she is also a Bail Bondsperson and an accountant (for those that need taxes done )

    We do not kick in doors, fugitives don't answer doors but their kids will go to the door. Kicking a door in and knocking a 2 year old through a wall while trying to re-arrest a fugitive on a misdemeanor is ridiculous. A great number of states have moved to no forced entry statutes to eliminate the cowboys of this industry.

    Scott

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Quote Originally Posted by Rupert E MacLean III View Post
    Kathy Blackshear is one of the most respected Bail Enforcement Agents in the country, she is also a Bail Bondsperson and an accountant (for those that need taxes done )

    We do not kick in doors, fugitives don't answer doors but their kids will go to the door. Kicking a door in and knocking a 2 year old through a wall while trying to re-arrest a fugitive on a misdemeanor is ridiculous. A great number of states have moved to no forced entry statutes to eliminate the cowboys of this industry.

    Scott
    I am in Michigan and interested in Fugitive Recovery and was wondering if you knew of someone or if Kathy might know someone in Michigan that i might contact or have them contact me who is interested in taking on an apprentice. I have severals yrs experince in surveillance and I have worked for child support court as an process server and would like the help. I also am a executive protection perfessional. Willing to learn from the best.

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    yes thank you very much for that info very good ,can you uptain a bail enfor ,lic in co with a co corp,

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    For those interested in Bail Enforcement as an addition to your PI business; there is an excellent user group called Fugitive Recovery Network and it is accessible to new people as well as experienced people. It has members that are very knowledgeable in their local area and can assist with recoveries nationwide.

    In this business, putting hand cuffs on someone is not always required, as exonerating the bondsman is your main focus. Often, this can be accomplished through court motions supported by investigation based evidence as well as other means. Mitigating liability is the key to gaining a reputation and garnering more business.

    Scott

  20. #20

    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Lucatorto View Post
    I have just completed my required training to become a "Fugitive Recovery Person" here in California. I think that for the most part California has a good system. If anyone is interested in becoming a bounty hunter here they should take a look at the requirements at: http://www.researchandinformation.com/PC1299.pdf

    I have several contacts and can,t wait to get started.

    Good luck to us all.

    Mark
    the link isn't good

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Hello all i am a bea in New Jersey and have a team with over 17 years in the buisness and now NJ has put a licensing law its gona weed out all these fake wana be bail enforcement agents its sad that the good agents have to suffer for the bad ones but thats life i am a corporation owner with ipiu and am in the process of trying to move my company to jersey so i can be licensed in New Jersey because i also believe pi make better beas i am reffering all beas to join ipiu and i am sure they will agree it will help broden there horizon and help them become better bea

  22. #22

    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    I do some work for bail bonds because of my email tracing I'm able to locate the skips when they open their email. Too bad more bond companies don't ask for emails on their forms.
    I could never do that kind of work full time out of the bail bonds office. I worked out of one a few hours a week on a guy that skipped on 100k bail. Too many shady people coming and going. I was in contact with the guys friends and neighbors and family and they were all ratting him out for a few bucks.

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    What is the requirements to be a Bounty Hunter in the state of Indiana? anyone?
    Thanks

    Kyle Forgue
    Licensed Private investigator

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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Forgue View Post
    What is the requirements to be a Bounty Hunter in the state of Indiana? anyone?
    Kyle, go to the following link:
    INDIANA LAW: Recovery Agents
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    Re: Private Investigators in Fugitive Recovery

    Good info on bea just be careful

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